Volume 7 Supplement 1

World Psychiatric Association (WPA) Thematic Conference. Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry: A Comprehensive Review

Open Access

Involuntary treatment and review and the Victorian human rights charter: uneasy compatibility in the antipodes?

  • John Lesser1
BMC Psychiatry20077(Suppl 1):S65

DOI: 10.1186/1471-244X-7-S1-S65

Published: 19 December 2007

Background

In this presentation, the presenter will explore a number of basic rights to be expressly protected under the Human Rights Charter (HRC), passed in 2006 by the Victorian Parliament, analyze the impact of the HRC and the issues faced by the Mental Health Review Board of Victoria (MHRB) and Victorian mental health service providers under the Victorian Mental Health Act 1986 (MHA), and consider appropriate operational responses to the challenges and potential problems for the MHRB and service providers in this new human rights-dominant environment.

Methods

The presenter will base the discussion and analysis on the work of a working party of Board members established in late 2006 to prepare for the commencement of the HRC in January 2008. It will be informed by a 2007 study tour of other comparable jurisdictions.

Results

The presenter will attempt to predict the important impacts, particularly on the Board's fundamental role to hear appeals and conduct reviews in respect of the involuntary treatment of people with a serious mental illness by applying statutory criteria which must be met before a person can be treated as an involuntary or compulsory patient. He will refer to both the Board's work and his study of comparable United Kingdom and European jurisdictions visited as part of a Churchill Fellowship-funded study tour.

Conclusion

The presenter will provide his assessment of the benefits and barriers that this new human rights dominant environment is likely to create for those involved in treatment and review of involuntary patients.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Mental Health Review Board of Victoria, Level 30

Copyright

© Lesser; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2007

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd.

Advertisement