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Table 1 DSM-IV melancholia (low-CORE, high-CORE) inpatients compared to inpatients with psychotic depression (CORE scores >12)

From: Should psychomotor disturbance be an essential criterion for a DSM-5 diagnosis of melancholia?

  Melancholia CORE 0 to 10 (N = 18) Melancholia CORE 15 to 31 (N = 14) Psychotic CORE 13 to 37 (n = 32)
Sex ratio 14 F : 4 M 9 F : 5 M 18 F : 14 M
Age (mean) 74.7 years 77.4 years 75.0 years
Age range 6985 years 6791 years 6587 years
Age of onset (mean) 49.8 years 65.4 years 56.2 years
Onset age 65+ 41% 79% 53%
Duration (mean) 35 weeks 49 weeks >50 weeks
Hamilton-17 (mean) 25.9 29.1 27.8
BAS (mean) 17.2 18.6 17.4*
MMSE 26.6 26.9 26.7*
Had depression previously 89% 64% 77%
Had antidepressants before 78% 64% 77%
Had E.C.T. previously 67% 50% 68%
Stress as precipitant 89% + 57% 52%
Diurnal variation (worse in a.m.: moderate/severe) 61% + 36% 10%
Unvarying depression 22% + 79% 100%
Worthlessness 61%+ (4/10 with score <8; 7/8 with score 8–10) 86% 74%
Punishment felt to be deserved 0% 29% (4/14) 52%
  1. * Data incomplete re BAS and MMSE for 4 inpatients with psychotic depression, but their MMSE scores were measured as >24 on discharge from hospital.
  2. + χ2 tests comparing low-CORE and high-CORE groups showed significant differences: Stress as precipitant2 = 6.70, p < .01), and Unvarying depression2 = 7.91, p < .01), but not for Diurnal variation2 = 1.14) or Worthlessness2 = 1.30).
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