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Table 2 Sample characterisitics (n = 47)

From: Indoor rock climbing (bouldering) as a new treatment for depression: study design of a waitlist-controlled randomized group pilot study and the first results

Variable Intervention group Waitlist group Total Test of group differences
(n = 22) (n = 25) (n = 47) χ2 U p
Agea, M (SD) 42.71 (11.88) 44.96 (12.08) 43.91 (11.91)   242.50 .49
Sex, n (%)        0.14   .71
Women 12 (54.5) 15 (60.0) 27 (57.5)    
Men 10 (45.5) 10 (40.0) 20 (42.5)    
School education, n (%)        3.84   .43
8 years 1 (4.5) 2 (8.0) 3 (6.4)    
10 years 3 (13.6) 7 (28.0) 10 (21.3)    
13 years 3 (13.6) 5 (20.0) 8 (17.0)    
Vocational training 4 (18.2) 5 (20.0) 9 (19.1)    
University 11 (50.0) 6 (24.0) 17 (36.2)    
Additional psychotherapy (n (%)        0.47   .49
yes 11 (50.0) 15 (60.0) 26 (55.3)    
no 11 (50.0) 10 (40.0) 21 (44.7)    
Antidepressants, n (%)        0.36   .55
yes 15 (68.2) 19 (76.0) 34 (72.3)    
no 7 (31.8) 6 (24.0) 13 (27.7)    
BMIa, M (SD) 26.81 (5.73) 24.56 (3.95) 25.61 (4.94)   201.00 .12
Already some experience with bouldering or rock climbing, n (%)        0.10   .75
yes 8 (36.4) 8 (32.0) 16 (34.0)    
no 14 (63.6) 17 (68.0) 31 (66.0)    
WHO well-being scalea M (SD) 8.86 (4.63) 8.08 (4.93) 8.45 (4.76)   237.50 .42
  1. adeviation from normal distribution (Shapiro-Wilk Test)
  2. BMI: Body Mass Index