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Table 3 Gender identity and sexual orientation differences in number of participants with clinically significant levels of self-reported symptoms of mental illness

From: Mental health help seeking patterns and associations among Australian same sex attracted women, trans and gender diverse people: a survey-based study

  Perceived stressa Distressb Depressionc Anxietyd Mental health problems
  N Above (%) N Above (%) N Above (%) N Above (%) N Yes (%)
Gender identity p < .001 p < .001 p < .001 p = .10* p = .01
 Female 1178 16.6 1162 27.7 1156 54.2 1152 97.4 1277 78.9
 Trans female 76 30.3 76 51.3 76 67.1 76 96.1 80 85.0
 Other 138 31.2 136 53.7 135 76.3 135 100.0 151 88.1
Sexual orientation p < .001 p < .001 p < .001 p = .03* p < .001
 Lesbian 739 14.2 728 23.9 728 49.0 726 96.4 798 74.8
 Queer 195 25.1 194 35.1 191 60.2 191 100.0 219 85.8
 Bi-sexual 242 21.9 240 37.9 238 65.1 236 98.7 262 82.8
 Pan-sexual 131 32.1 128 45.3 128 73.4 128 97.7 136 91.9
 Other 86 15.1 85 50.6 83 72.3 83 98.8 94 87.2
  1. Note: N = total number of participants who obtained a scale score. Above % = percentage of participants above the cut-off score
  2. *Monte Carlo test used due to small expected cell frequencies
  3. aThe Perceived Stress Questionnaire for Younger Women. Score range: 11–66. Cut-off score: 2 or more = high risk
  4. bThe Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Score range: 10–50. Cut-off score: 30 or more = high risk
  5. cThe Center for Epidemiologic Studies Short Depression Scale. Score range: 0–30. Cut-off score: 10 or more = high risk
  6. dHospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Anxiety Subscale. Score range: 0–21. Cut-off score: 8 or more = high risk