Skip to main content

Table 4 Association between end-line emotional distress and various factors

From: Secondary distress in violence researchers: a randomised trial of the effectiveness of group debriefings

Elevated end-line emotional distress Unadjusted OR (N = 48) Adjusted OR (N = 48)
UOR 95% CI P AOR 95% CI P
Elevated baseline emotional distressa 10 2.26;44.02 0.002 16.1 2.82;92.7 0.002
Personal trauma history, lifetime
 Intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violenceb 2.43 0.64;9.14 0.188 0.86 0.15;4.76 0.86
Paid work experience (≥ 5 years)b 0.95 0.27;3.33 0.94 1.14 0.26; 5.03 0.85
Referred primary trauma cases, past 5 weekb
 0 to 7 cases 1    1   
 8 to 41 cases 1.01 0.27;3.73 0.97 0.67 0.14, 3.24 0.62
Perceived primary trauma cases, past 5 weeksb
 0 to 2 cases 1    1   
 3 to 20 cases 0.46 0.13;1.64 0.23 0.89 0.19;4.11 0.88
Perceived organisational supportc, past 5 weeksb 0.17 0.03;0.87 0.03 0.09 0.01;0.69 0.02
Coping mechanismsb
 Support of family and friends 1.07 0.30;3.77 0.91 2.6 0.43;15.62 0.29
 Personal belief in God 0.28 0.07; 1.13 0.07 0.21 0.03; 1.26 0.09
 Spending time alone/music/television 2.9 0.79; 10.6 0.1 2.57 0.55; 11.9 0.22
 Medication to alleviate symptoms of stress 11.6 2.71; 50.07 0.001 18.9 2.76; 129.27 0.003
  1. aModelled separately, adjusted for age, sex and participation in control or debrief group.
  2. bModelled separately, adjusted for sex, participation in control or debrief group and baseline emotional distress.
  3. cComposite perceived levels of organisational support (agree with 3/5 statements)