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Table 4 Association of stressors with depression, anxiety, and burnout

From: Depression, anxiety, and burnout among medical students and residents of a medical school in Nepal: a cross-sectional study

Stressor groupsDepression,
χ2, P-value
n (%)
Anxiety,
χ2, P-value
n (%)
Burnout,
χ2, P-value
n (%)
ARS9.69, 0.00213.19, P < 0.00115.25, P < 0.0001
 Present (n = 558)186 (33.3)269 (48.2)290 (52)
 Absent (n = 93)16 (17.2)26 (28)28 (30.1)
IRS8.72, 0.00315.18, P < 0.000115.26, P < 0.0001
 Present (n = 420)147 (35)214 (51)229 (54.5)
 Absent (n = 231)55 (23.8)81 (35.1)89 (38.5)
TLRS26.87, P < 0.000132.11, P < 0.000155.32, P < 0.0001
 Present (n = 390)151 (38.7)212 (54.4)237 (60.8)
 Absent (n = 261)51 (19.5)83 (31.8)81 (31)
SRS7.93, 0.0059.04, 0.0038.27, 0.004
 Present (n = 389)137 (35.2)195 (50.1)208 (53.5)
 Absent (n = 262)65 (24.8)100 (38.2)110 (42)
DRS19.54, P < 0.00017.55, 0.00663.17, P < 0.0001
 Present (n = 284)114 (40.1)146 (51.4)189 (66.5)
 Absent (n = 367)88 (24)149 (40.6)129 (35.1)
GARS32.12, P < 0.000129.78, P < 0.000137.03, P < 0.0001
 Present (n = 426)164 (38.5)226 (53.1)245 (57.5)
 Absent (n = 225)38 (16.9)69 (30.7)73 (32.4)
  1. Note. ARS Academic Related Stressor, IRS Interpersonal and intrapersonal Related stressor, TLRS Teaching and Learning Related Stressor, SRS Social Related Stressor, DRS Drive and Desire Related Stressor; GARS Group Activities Related Stressor
  2. all P-values were obtained by using the Chi-squared test.