Open Access

Erratum to: Significant treatment effect of adjunct music therapy to standard treatment on the positive, negative, and mood symptoms of schizophrenic patients: a meta-analysis

  • Ping-Tao Tseng1Email author,
  • Yen-Wen Chen2,
  • Pao-Yen Lin3, 4,
  • Kun-Yu Tu1,
  • Hung-Yu Wang1,
  • Yu-Shian Cheng1,
  • Yi-Chung Chang1,
  • Chih-Hua Chang1,
  • Weilun Chung1 and
  • Ching-Kuan Wu1
Contributed equally
BMC PsychiatryBMC series – open, inclusive and trusted201616:150

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-016-0846-1

Received: 20 April 2016

Accepted: 4 May 2016

Published: 17 May 2016

The original article was published in BMC Psychiatry 2016 16:16
In article “Significant treatment effect of adjunct music therapy to standard treatment on the positive, negative, and mood symptoms of schizophrenic patients: a meta-analysis [1]”, some values of Hedges’ g in main results of the meta-analysis might mislead the readers’ interpretation of our results. Different values of Hedges’ g may derive from different methods of standardization when using Comprehensive Meta-analysis software. The main results of significance in current study remained significant. By using different method of standardization, we found that the main treatment effect of adjunct music therapy in schizophrenia was significantly larger than those without adjunct music therapy (Hedges’ g = 0.596, 95 % CI = 0.350-0.842, p < 0.001). At the same time, the treatment effect of adjunct music therapy in schizophrenia remained significantly larger than those without adjunct music therapy in scores of positive symptoms, negative symptoms, and mood symptoms (Hedges’ g = 0.483, 95 % CI = 0.053-0.913, p = 0.028; Hedges’ g = 0.673, 95 % CI = 0.385-0.961, p < 0.001; Hedges’ g = 0.677, 95 % CI = 0.434-0.919, p < 0.001, separately).
Fig. 2

a Forest plot showing effect sizes (Hedges’ g) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) from individual studies and pooled results of all included studies comparing total psychopathology between patients with schizophrenia receiving music therapy (MT) and those who did not receive music therapy (Ctr); (b) Forest plot showing effect sizes (Hedges’ g) and 95 % CIs from individual studies and pooled results comparing total psychopathology between patients with schizophrenia receiving MT and the Ctr group by trial design, such as non-randomized control trials (non-RCT) and randomized control trials (RCT). *subscales in the report by Hayashi (2002): positive symptoms (p), negative symptoms (n), and general psychopathology (g). (A) The treatment effect was better in the MT group than in the Ctr group (p < 0.001). (B) The treatment effect was better in the MT group than in the Ctr group in both non-RCT and RCT subgroups (p = 0.132 and <0.001, respectively)

Fig. 3

Forest plot showing effect sizes (Hedges’ g) and 95 % confident intervals (CIs) from individual studies and pooled results comparing (a) positive symptoms, (b) negative symptoms, and (c) mood symptoms between schizophrenic patients who received music therapy (MT) and those who did not (Ctr). (A) The treatment effect was better in the MT group compared to the Ctr group in subscales of positive symptoms (p = 0.028). (B) The treatment effect was better in the MT group compared to the Ctr group in subscales of negative symptoms (p < 0.001). (C) The treatment effect was better in the MT group compared to the Ctr group in subscales of mood symptoms (p < 0.001)

Notes

Declarations

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Psychiatry, Tsyr-Huey Mental Hospital, Kaohsiung Jen-Ai’s Home, Taiwan
(2)
Department of Neurology, E-Da Hospital
(3)
Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine
(4)
Center for Translational Research in Biomedical Sciences, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital

Reference

  1. Tseng PT, Chen YW, Lin PY, Tu KY, Wang HY, Cheng YS, et al. Significant treatment effect of adjunct music therapy to standard treatment on the positive, negative, and mood symptoms of schizophrenic patients: a meta-analysis. BMC Psychiatry. 2016;16(1):16.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© Tseng et al. 2016

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